38 IRRAWADDY ROAD #07-28
MOUNT ELIZABETH NOVENA SPECIALIST CENTRE
CONTACT: +65 6355 0522

Fighting back and chest acne

December 10, 2018

When it comes to acne, most of us tend to think of facial acne – the most visible form of acne vulgaris. Back and chest acne, or truncal acne, is often overlooked even though more than half of people with facial acne can also have truncal acne. Further, acne on any part of the body can impact one’s self-esteem, body image or self-confidence.

What causes truncal acne?

Truncal acne develops in a similar way to facial acne. Major causes of acne include excess sebum secretion, abnormal desquamation (shedding) of skin cells, the presence of the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes (P.acnes), and inflammation. These elements can be found as much on the back and chest as on the face.

Genetics is also a crucial component. Your genetic disposition can influence the formation of comedones or the way your body responds to the P. acnes on your skin.

Acne forms when abnormal desquamation of epithelial cells causes sebum and keratin to accumulate and block hair follicles. This creates comedones – either open blackheads or closed whiteheads.

An increased production of sebum also creates an ideal environment for P.acnes to thrive, especially during puberty when oil glands are excited by hormones called androgens. The activated oil glands produce inflammatory factors, such as cytokines, that increase the skin’s inflammatory response.

Your back, shoulders and chest are also more prone to acne mechanica, meaning acne caused by the pressure, occlusion, friction or heat of clothing or physical activity. Sports equipment, such as shoulder pads and tight straps, can further exacerbate acne. Sweaty clothing traps sweat, oils and substances that support the growth of  P. acnes. As a result, be sure to change out of sweaty clothing after a workout or seek shade when the sun is at its strongest.

How can I treat truncal acne?

First-line therapy for truncal acne should always be a combination of a topical and antimicrobial treatment to reduce the risk of bacteria resistance. Treatment lengths should also be kept as short as possible – to a three to four month course – and cautiously managed by an accredited dermatologist.

Topical treatments

  • Benzoyl peroxide: Decreases inflammation and abnormal desquamation. It also contains anti-microbial properties that kill bacteria, but can bleach clothing and bedding. As such, it may be less desirable for treatment of truncal acne
  • Retinoids: Reduce comedonal formation, expel mature comedones and exert anti-inflammatory effects.
  • Antibiotics e.g. erythromycin, clindamycin: Reduce the proliferation of P.acnes but are not recommended to be used as the only form of treatment due to the risk that bacteria will grow resistant to the effects of medication.
  • Azelaic acid: A newer form of treatment that has three pharmacological effects: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and stabilizing on abnormal desquamation. Above all, azelaic acid also fades post-acne marks by inhibiting the release of tyrosinanse, an enzyme that controls the production of melanin.

While skin on the body can withstand acne medication that may be too irritating on facial skin, they can be harder to apply on the back. Also, skin on the body is thicker than the face and may respond more slowly to treatment.

Oral antibiotics

Antibiotics work to limit the proliferation of P.acnes, which makes them useful in treating moderate to severe acne.

Hormonal therapies

Oral contraceptives work to reduce androgen levels, which in turn decreases sebum production. Oral contraceptives are effective against inflammatory acne in females. Patients who do not mind being on contraceptives can consider this treatment.

Oral isotretinoin

Isotretinoin is a form of oral retinoid that is effective against severe. It helps to decrease sebum production, bacterial proliferation, inflammation and abnormal rate of skin cells shedding.

However, isotretinoin can have severe side effects.  It can disturb the development of a fetus and cause birth defects if the mother is taking it at the time of conception or during pregnancy.  Other potential side effects include mood changes, liver damage, or fluctuations in lipid levels. As a result, this medication should be cautiously managed by a dermatologist.

Cleansing

Proper cleansing should also follow alongside other treatment therapies. Dr. TWL’s Miel Honey™ Cleanser is a dermatologist-formulated cleanser ideal for acne-prone skin and uses medical grade honey as an anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. A gentle cleanser that lathers up from botanical emulsifiers, the foam produced is generous and refreshing on the skin.

Cosmeceuticals

Truncal acne patients can also consider cosmeceuticals as part of their treatment. Cosmeceuticals are cosmetic products that contain active ingredients that deliver medical benefits to the skin. Vitamin C, in particular, works as an antioxidant that helps clear the skin of inflammation. Another botanical to consider is Arnica Montana flower extract, which is especially beneficial for acne-prone skin as it stabilises inflammation and reduces skin flaking.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

—–

Meet with Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

 

 

Tags: , , , ,
error: Copyright © 2017 twlskin.com. All rights reserved.