Tag Archive: anti-ageing

How Oligopeptides Work for Anti-ageing

July 29, 2019

Oligopeptides were first discovered to have therapeutic properties in the 1950s by du Vigneau and Tuppy when they characterised the chemical structure of the first peptide hormone, octapeptide oxytocin which led to an increasing interest in the field of bioactive peptides.

What are oligopeptides?

Oligopeptides are short sequence amino acids which are defined as peptide (protein) sequences which range from 2 to 20 amino acids. The key feature of these proteins is that they have been discovered to be biologically active, meaning that it can interfere with various skin processes both on the cell and the molecular level.

Oligopeptides have been described as early as twenty years ago when researchers discovered some chemicals in the body which can affect physiological processes. The understanding of how the same oligopeptides can influence activity within the skin has only been recently examined and it is an interesting and rapidly advancing field of dermatologist research.

What are some of the benefits that oligopeptides have been shown to have in skin?

Several dermatologist led studies published in top journals have shown that common skin ageing conditions such as hyperpigmentation as well as skin thinning, loss of skin elasticity can be well-treated with good outcomes with these oligopeptides1.

How do oligopeptides work?

Oligopeptides interfere with the regulation of collagen and elastin production which accounts for many of the changes in ageing skin such as skin laxity, loss of skin plumpness and enlarged pores. Finally, it also helps to regulate pigment (melanin synthesis) which can help to treat pigmentary disorders. 

Are oligopeptides safe in cosmeceuticals?

The key benefits of oligopeptides are equivalent to retinoids which have been used in dermatologist offices for several decades but without the same side effects. Retinoid treatment can also help to increase collagen and elastin production as well as regulating melanin synthesis but not without the significant side effects of skin dryness and irritation, causing redness, flaking and sometimes flare-ups of cystic acne over time. Oligopeptides are considered much safer and easy for incorporation into skincare being well-absorbed. 

What happens during skin ageing and how do oligopeptides work?

Skin ageing is caused by a multitude of factors such as one’s genes, environmental damage, hormonal alterations and metabolic processes. During the process of ageing, one may notice increased wrinkles, skin sallowness and laxity, loss of radiance, enlarged pores as well as loss of skin volume, causing a haggard, dry and wrinkled appearance. What’s going on under the skin can really be explained in terms of physiological processes. If you refer to the diagram of the structure of the skin in Chapter I of the book, allow yourself to look at the second layer of the skin which is known as the dermis. The best way I can explain the process of ageing to my patients is via this skin model, so everything that has got to do with the loss of skin radiance, sallowness, pigmentation occur at the epidermal level which can be effectively addressed with topical cream applications as well as physical agents such as chemical peels which help to shed the top layer of skin which are known as the keratinocytes to stimulate cell turnover, leading to increased radiance. 

Most of skin ageing however, happens in the dermal level in the second layer of skin – the dermis, where collagen and elastin is present and production of these components are decreased during the process of skin ageing, leading to loss of skin volume. 

The proteins in the dermis are known as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. How oligopeptides work is mainly in the second layer of skin when they stimulate these ECM proteins and also, help to regulate the production of pigment at this level.

How do oligopeptides help wound healing?

Bioactive peptides such as oligopeptides have shown potential health benefits to combat inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis and antimicrobial defense.

In the same way when one’s skin is wounded, for example either from trauma or severe inflammation such as in post-inflammation hyperpigmentation or in severe cystic acne flares leading to scars, oligopeptides interfere with the second layer of skin where most of the wound healing takes place to stimulate the production of collagen so that the wound heals faster as well as better.

Bioactive peptides as medical and therapeutic interventions have great potential. They have been utilised as treatments for infections, chemotherapy and in recent times as cosmeceuticals. The best qualities of this molecule I believe have to do with our ability to alter the penetration, delivery, stability and potency.

Reference:
1. Reddy, B. , Jow, T. and Hantash, B. M. (2012), Bioactive oligopeptides in dermatology: Part I. Exp Dermatol, 21: 563-568.

© 2019 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

Understanding Fillers

December 18, 2018

 

Dermal fillers are minimally invasive mainstay cosmetic treatments used to help return the appearance of volume and youth to ageing skin. Volume deficiency, scars, wrinkles, lip augmentation (plumping), facial sculpting and contouring are common facial concerns targeted by dermal fillers.

This guide will tell you everything you need to know about them: how they work, the choices of products on the market, and their possible side effects on your body and skin.

What are dermal fillers?

Before starting on dermal fillers, we need a brief understanding of how the face changes as we age. Over time, the thickness and elasticity of our skin decreases, and our faces loses fat. Soft tissues sag, facial muscles weaken, and the outermost layer of skin wrinkles.

Enter fillers. Dermal fillers help restore lost volume to your face and add lift.

Types of dermal fillers

The classifications of dermal fillers vary according to their properties. Fillers are categorized based on their biodegradability, how long it takes before the filling substance is absorbed by the body, and the duration of a treatment’s effect.

Early attempts to use fillers for facial rejuvenation relied on dermal fat or collagen fillers. However, the effectiveness of fat as a filling agent was risky as a number of variables were involved. These included the method and type of fat harvested, both of which could cause inconsistent absorption rates by the body. There could also be significant side effects including prolonged swelling, internal bruising and cause infections. Bovine (cattle) collagen, the first collage filler used, also had limited success due to its short duration of effect (3-4 months) and potential risk of allergic reaction.

Human-based collagen has since been developed but demand for collagen remains low compared to more effective filling agents.

Biodegradable fillers

These are fillers that provide temporary or semi-permanent effects as they gradually degrade and get absorbed by the body. Common biodegradable fillers are collagen, hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactic acid.

Hyaluronic acid

Naturally present in our skin and connective tissues, hyaluronic acid is a key structural component that stabilizes cellular structures and binds collagen and elastic fibers. Hyaluronic acid remains as the most widely used dermal filler due to its ease of use, safety and minimal side effects.

When hyaluronic acid is injected into the skin, it combines with the natural hyaluronic acid found in our body. Due to its hygroscopic nature (ability to absorb water from surroundings), hyaluronic acid binds to water quickly, creating volume that lasts for 6 to 12 months before degrading into the body. It also induces new collagen formation, a desirable quality as our bodies gradually stop producing collagen in our late twenties.

Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA)

A synthetic, biodegradable polymer of the alpha-hydroxyl-acid family (natural acids found in food), poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is another common filling agent. Its safe profile enables PLLA to be actively used in other medical applications such as in dissolvable stiches or soft tissue implants.

PLLA triggers mild inflammation to promote the formation of collagen and tissue fibers. The accumulation of collagen creates volume at the site of injection. Over time, PLLA breaks down into lactic acid and is metabolized to carbon dioxide or incorporated into glucose molecules.

Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA)

CaHA is a synthetic compound with a chemical structure that resembles a component found in our bones and teeth. Treatment with CaHA is safe and will not cause allergic reactions. When injected into skin tissues, our body gradually absorbs CaHA, inducing new collagen to be produced. Such an effect typically lasts about 15 months or longer.

CaHA breaks down into calcium and phosphate ions before finally being excreted by the body.

Nonbiodegradable fillers

Silicone

Injecting silicone into the face adds volume directly and immediately and also triggers collagen production that adds to the effect. Silicone is favoured for its stable chemical structure, ease of use, low cost, and long-lasting effects. As a non-biodegradable filler, silicone stays in your body once it is injected.

However, the use of silicon in cosmetic treatments is controversial due to its potential to cause long-term complications such as abnormal swelling, blindness or nerve damage. Issues can also arise from poor injection technique, the amount of silicone used and differences in silicone grades. For these reasons, it is strongly recommended you get your fillers done only by a trained dermatologist.

Warnings and alternatives

Administered professionally and with the proper technique and expertise, a dermal filler comes with minimal side effects. However, with many different rejuvenation treatments available, it’s important you consult a trusted dermatologist for a professional assessment before commencing treatment.

For those who prefer plumping effects without an injection, go for Dr TWL’s Hyaluronic Acid serum. As a skincare ingredient, hyaluronic acid draws moisture from its surroundings and keeps the skin well-hydrated; it is able to hold over 1,000 times its own weight in water. This gives a desirable plumping effect and improves fine lines and wrinkles without the needles.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.
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Meet with Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.
To book an appointment with Dr Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

All About Male Pattern Hair Loss

October 8, 2018

Male pattern hair loss, or androgenetic alopecia, is exceedingly common. Hair thinning and hair loss can begin as early as late adolescence and progress with age. Understanding why it happens, including its strong genetic element, can help men counter its effects.

Characteristics of male pattern hair loss (MPHL)

MPHL typically begins first with bitemporal recession – triangular, usually symmetrical, areas of recession at the frontal hairline. Thinning starts in the temples as well as the crown/vertex and slowly progresses to encompass the entire top of the scalp.

The disease onset and progression vary from person to person. Initial signs of male pattern hair loss usually develop during teenage years and lead to progressive hair loss and thinning of the hair across the scalp.

Causes of male pattern hair loss

A genetic predisposition is considered a major risk factor for male pattern hair loss, as genetics determine the activity level of the androgenic hormones that lead to MPHL. However, this condition can also be present even in individuals without a family history.

In the hair follicle cells, a male hormone called testosterone converts into an active form and binds to the androgenic receptors in the hair follicle. Individuals with male pattern hair loss have abnormal sensitivity of hair follicles, allowing easier binding to receptors.

This specific bonding triggers cellular processes that cut short the anagen phase of the hair cycle, the stage where hair follicles grow. For this reason, the hair follicles enter the telogen phase earlier where programmed cell death happens.

In normal hair follicles, the duration of the anagen phase lasts from two to seven years. Individuals with male pattern hair loss have an anagen phase that ranges from a few years to just weeks.

With the decreased duration of the anagen phase, more hair follicles enter the telogen phase. Telogen hairs are more easily plucked than anagen hairs. Thus, individuals will notice increased hair shedding as they comb their hair.

An increased amount of androgen also causes hair follicles to be transformed into thin, vellus-like hairs. As a result, hairs are finer and lack pigmentation.

Topical and oral treatments

Topical and systemic drugs are often used in treating MPHL. The most common topical drug is minoxidil.  Originally developed as an oral medication for hypertension, its common side effect of excessive hair growth has led to its use as a treatment. Minoxidil 2% or 5% solution is often used in topical application to prolong the anagen phase.

Other anti-androgen drugs include fluridil and finasteride. A topical application of fluridil helps suppress androgen receptors in hair follicles. Finasteride is available as oral medication and reduces the conversion of testosterone into its active form. Finasteride has also shown to reverse the effects of follicle miniaturization.

Copper peptide is another ingredient that stimulates hair regrowth. Made up of amino acids, copper peptides have regenerative properties that work to increase hair follicle size and reduce hair loss. By fighting inflammation and free radicals, copper peptides also protect the hair follicles from being damaged.

For a hair regrowth serum without any toxicity or irritation, look to Copper Peptide Hair Regrowth Serum.

All treatments for MPHL are for long-term use, which means stopping the treatment will cause your hair loss condition to return. Before committing to any topical treatment, it is recommended to consult an accredited dermatologist for professional advice.

Light therapy as treatment

Low light, intense pulsed light, and red light treatment can initiate hair regrowth. Red light treatment, with wavelengths between 630 to 670 nm, stimulates an enzyme called cytochrome C. This enzyme encourages our genes to produce more hair and lowers the cell death of hair follicles.

Using a laser comb for 15 minutes, three times a week, also increases the number of hair follicles in the anagen phase, the stage in which our hair grows. The comb is available as a stand-alone or adjunctive therapy.

All treatments are currently available at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

Sleep Deprivation and The Skin

September 6, 2018

 

Have you ever woken up groggy from less than six hours sleep and felt your skin is looking unwell? Ever wonder why?

How lack of sleep impacts your skin

Dehydrates the skin

The skin barrier works as a shield against environmental threats and prevents excessive water loss. When you don’t get enough sleep, your skin barrier can weaken and your levels of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) can be higher. TEWL is the amount of water lost to external environments via evaporation. Increased water loss dries out our skin, which can cause skin scaling and increased desquamation or the shedding of the skin’s outermost cells.

Imagining your skin cells as bricks and the lipids/fats in between as mortar, dehydrated skin has a more ‘disorganised’ brick and mortar structure; this causes more light to bounce off the surface. In comparison, hydrated skin has an ‘organised’ structure, allowing more light to penetrate the skin and giving off a translucent appearance.

Your pores can also appear larger with lack of sleep. While you will not have an increased number of pores if you sleep less, increased skin scaling causes a coarser skin texture and can make pores appear enlarged.

Reduces immune system function

Sleep also plays a role in restoring the body’s immune system function. Any change in the immune response may affect collagen production and lead to impaired skin integrity.

Inflames the skin

Sleep deprivation also triggers increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn modify the structures of collagen molecules. Collagen gives the skin its elasticity and flexibility. Assembling into a dense network of fibres, collagen holds the dermis layer together and protects the skin from external sources such as bacterial agents or ultraviolet radiation. Lower collagen levels manifest as thinner and wrinkled skin.

Ages your skin

Poor sleepers may experience uneven pigmentation, fine wrinkling, skin laxity, loss of facial fat and benign skin growths.

Chronic poor quality of sleep is also associated with accelerated intrinsic ageing. Intrinsic ageing results from factors inherent in chronological ageing such as metabolic oxidative stress.

Stress is also a likely factor inherent in the lack of sleep. In response to stress, your brain releases an excess of stress hormones called glucocorticoids. This hormone causes negative effects on nearly all body tissues and accelerates the aging process. Glucocorticoids also inhibit lipid production, which eventually weakens skin integrity.

Regain your skin’s well-rested radiance

If you covet a seemingly translucent, pore-less look, it’s no surprise that we suggest you catch up on your sleep.

However, while you’re trying to change your sleep habits, providing rich hydration to your skin can also help compensate for some of your sleep loss. Apart from a moisturizer, a good boost of hydration also can come from an effective hyaluronic acid serum.


© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

 

 

 

 

What Is A Medifacial?

August 17, 2018

 

Spa facials are now commonplace, offered everywhere from shopping malls to neighbourhood estates. While these may help you unwind,  conventional spa facials may not be able to deliver effective results to your skin, and they may even cause more harm than good.

This is because facials at conventional spas or beauty salons are unsupervised by a doctor and may cause irritation and skin sensitivity. Often they include forceful extraction of pimples, blackheads and whiteheads that not only inflame the skin and cause pain but also increase the chances of secondary infections and deep scarring. Some of our patients have even contracted viral warts from contaminated instruments used for pimple extraction.

Enter the Medifacial. Short for medical facial, it is a procedure performed at a licensed medical establishment with non-invasive dermatological procedures. It causes neither pain or scarring, and uses pharmaceutical grade solutions and serums. A form of microdermabrasion very gently exfoliates dead skin cells, and a specialized vacuum handpiece extracts blackheads and whiteheads. The procedure both removes impurities and intensely hydrates with potent serums, including antioxidants and hydroxy acids, that soothe and rejuvenate the skin.

Medifacials can be tailored to the address a patient’s individual skin concerns including:

Microdermabrasion

Microdermabrasion is a safe and painless resurfacing procedure that results in decreased levels of melanin and increased collagen density. Not to be confused with dermabrasion, it targets the epidermis – the outer skin layer – instead of the dermis which is the deeper skin layer.

In conventional dermabrasion, a handpiece sprays inert crystals onto the face – such as aluminium oxide, magnesium oxide or sodium chloride or other abrasive substances – and vacuums them off.

In a medifacial, the microdermabrasion process uses a specialized vacuum handpiece embedded with an abrasion tip that is designed to rotate and gently exfoliate the skin while concurrently applying a soothing solution. The vacuum pressure and speed is adjusted to each patient’s sensitivity and tolerance to maintain as comfortable a procedure as possible.

The mechanism of abrasion and suction gently exfoliates the outer skin layers to remove dead skin cells. With a superficial depth of skin removal, microdermabrasion helps improve the conditions of skin surface such as scarring or photodamaged skin.

By producing controlled superficial trauma, the procedure also promotes facial rejuvenation. Repetitive injury to the epidermis can cause gradual improvement as it stimulates collagen production and fibroblast proliferation. (Fibroblast are cells found in connective tissues that produce collagen and other fibres.) This allows new collagen deposition in the dermis layer.

Mild erythema (redness) may occur at the end of a microdermabrasion treatment but will subside within hours. Microdermabrasion should not be confused with dermabrasion.

Extraction

If you have self-extracted comedones at home, you will likely be aware of the excessive scarring and breakouts that often follow. It is likely that the right pressure or angle is not applied during home extractions, disrupting the integrity of follicles and causing inflammation. Not using medically sterilised equipment can also lead to infections, exacerbating the condition.

In a dermatologist’s office, extraction is safely and easily performed and rarely leaves residual scarring. An accredited dermatologist can first assess between comedones that are suitable for extraction versus those that are not. After prepping the skin with alcohol, a tiny prick incision is made with a surgical blade to lightly pierce the epidermis. Light or medium pressure is applied directly on top of the comedo until all of the contents are removed. The treatment may cause minor discomfort but also help achieve an almost instant improvement in skin appearance.

In a medifacial, the microdermasion and vacuum processes, together with specialized and hydrating solutions, “loosen” and extract blackheads, whiteheads, excess sebum, keratin and other impurities. The specialized medifacial handpiece creates a strong vacuum with precision control that targets comedones from enlarged pores and removes the associated waste from the epidermis. It avoids collateral damage to the surrounding tissue and is completely painless.

Application of potent serums

In a medifacial, topical application of various serums and solutions is carried out continuously using the specialized treatment handpiece. The serums contain a potent mix of sodium hyaluronate, antioxidants and hydroxy acids that are applied at different stages of treatment to achieve a variety of effects such as skin hydration, lightening of pigmentation and softening of the skin for exfoliation and extraction.

Antioxidants are substances that protect our body and skin from oxidative damage. With their highly protective and rejuvenating properties, they are a mainstay in skincare formulations and key ingredients in a medifacial treatment. Antioxidants used include vitamin E, vitamin C, and rosa damascena (or rose water) that have brightening effects to help skin achieve a radiant glow.

Larecea Extract™ is a dermatologist-formulated combination of bioactive antioxidants derived from brassica olereacea (cruciferous family plants)  and potent regenerative amino acids. It is a trademarked ingredient in the Dr.TWL Dermaceuticals’ cosmeceutical line.

Hydroxy acids help remove the top layer (epidermis) of dead skin cells. They do this by dissolving the ‘cement’ between skin cells, revealing smoother and firmer skin. Hydroxy acids used in a medifacial treatment include salicylic acid and lactic acids. Lactic

So the next time you step out of a facial salon with unsatisfying results, do consider a medifacial instead. Conducted under the supervision of an accredited dermatologist, a medifacial clears up the skin and helps restore its brightness through microdermabrasion, extractions, and an infusion of potent nutrient serums that hydrate and rejuvenate. It also has zero downtime, and only requires liberal sunscreen application to protect against ultraviolet radiation afterwards.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What causes our skin to age?

June 13, 2018

What causes our skin to age?

We know that ageing is a natural process that cannot be changed. Fine lines, wrinkles, sagging and dark spots are some changes in the skin as we grow older. While some of these changes are unavoidable, certain signs of ageing are actually caused by sun damage and can be avoided. Some knowledge of the mechanism of the human ageing process can allow you to be more adept at ways to slow down such effects.

The process of skin aging can be classified into 2 groups: extrinsic ageing and intrinsic ageing. The two processes are biologically different.

Extrinsic ageing

This factor includes physical, chemical or environmental factors that the skin is exposed to. A major contributor to extrinsic ageing is UV radiation. Cumulative exposure to the sun in an individual’s lifetime can add up to cause significant damage to the skin.

Other external factors are cigarette smoking, air pollution, and exposure to cold, heat, dust and smog. Our lifestyle choices can also take a toll on our skin e.g. exercise, sleeping habits, diet or stress. Varying circumstances through all these factors can cause oxidative stress. This leads to some extent of dysfunction across our cells, mitochondria, DNA and could manifest as inflammation, cellular membrane damage or even immune dysfunction for instance.

UVA and UVB radiation causes photoageing. As UVA can penetrate deeper into the skin (greater penetration depth) and generate unwanted radicals, it is said to be more responsible for photoageing. UVB rays are mostly absorbed by the outer skin layers and causes DNA damage within the outer skin cells.

Photoageing

Photoageing is a slow process resulting from chronic exposure to UV radiation. Skin type and accumulative lifetime exposure to the sun can determine the degree of photoageing. When UV light penetrates the skin, cells produce melanin to form as a protective barrier (this is also how a tan is developed!). The melanin pigment helps to reflect some of the rays. The rest of the radiation that is not reflected will be absorbed by the skin cells. This can damage the cells that function to develop tissue fibers for the skin’s structure.

In photoaged skin, the epidermis (outermost skin layer) becomes more fragile and less elastic. There is greater damage of elastic tissue and a decrease in cellularity. It can cause elastosis, where there is an overgrowth of elastic fibers. Rough spots called actinic keratoses can also be caused by excessive UV exposure, which can be precancerous skin lesions.

Antioxidant and skin ageing

UV radiation causes oxidative damage. This means it produces excessive free radicals within the skin cells. Free radicals are formed when atoms or molecules loose electrons. They are generated by our own bodies during normal metabolic process, but external sources such as from UV radiation may cause excessive amounts. Excessive free radicals can lead to human skin disorders and premature skin ageing for example. Exposure to air pollutants can also trigger the release of free radicals.

The human skin has antioxidant enzymes to help protect against free radicals, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesizing enzymes. Other antioxidant molecules you may be familiar with are vitamins A, C and E. Antioxidants protect cells by interacting with the free radicals and neutralizing them by “donating” electrons to prevent unwanted damage.

You can think of the antioxidants as the ‘good’ molecules in your fight against ageing. However, these antioxidants reduce in number over time, thus a weaker ability to combat against free radicals and against ageing. With weaker defence against free radicals, the skin begins to show signs of photoageing.

Intrinsic ageing

Intrinsic ageing can also be understood as genetically programmed ageing. Structural proteins such as collagen and elastin, a major component of the dermis, and organelles such as mitochondria are produced less over the course of time. DNA functions and repair abilities decline with time. Thinning and loss of the skin’s elasticity happens as visible manifestations of these changes. Chronologic ageing can also be caused by hormonal changes.

Preventing the ageing process

To improve skin quality, there are various treatments available.

  • Sunscreens have been long perceived as a vital prevention measure to reduce UV damage. Look for a dermatologist tested sunscreen with minimum SPF30. Apply and reapply religiously (every 3 hours for optimal protection).
  • Retinoids have shown to reverse sun damage and can improve the skin’s extracellular matrix (which provides structural and biochemical support to cells).
  • Cosmeceuticals may serve as a ready consistent supply of antioxidants
  • Dermal fillers can restore volume loss and remove skin wrinkles
  • Chemical peels use acids to regenerate and improve the appearance of aged skin

On your own, certain lifestyle habits can be changed to slow down the process of skin ageing. Adequate exercise and sleep are vital in general regulation of bodily functions which combat aging. Quitting smoking can cut out exposure to unwanted chemicals and pollutants. A diet rich in antioxidants can also be helpful. Keep hydrated and cleanse your skin regularly to remove dirt and pollutants / chemicals (which may cause oxidative stress) from the skin.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

A Dermatologist Guide to Alpha Hydroxyl Acid (AHA) Facial Treatments

May 31, 2018

 

Alpha Hydroxyl Acid (AHA) Facial Treatments

Alpha hydroxy acids (AHA) are naturally-occurring compounds possessing unparalleled benefits to the skin and extensively used in a dermatologist’s office. Most AHAs are non-toxic and are often present in food and fruits, thus also known as fruit acids.

The types of AHA used commonly for cosmetic purposes are glycolic acid and lactic acid. Glycolic acid, found in sugar cane, has the smallest molecule of all the AHAs and is the most widely used acid in skincare. Lactic acid is present in sour milk and tomato juice and can be found in our bodies as a byproduct of metabolic processes.

Certain types of AHA have lipophilic (ability to dissolve in lipids/fats) side groups in its chemical structure such as mandelic acid and benzylic acid. Such acids are more soluble in lipids over the conventional water-soluble AHAs, thus are often used for oily and acne-prone skin.

Uses as a peeling agent

AHAs are commonly used in peeling procedures as a short intense exposure to the acid produces benefits to the skin. A chemical peel is the application of one or more chemical exfoliating agents to the skin, and by exerting a controlled epidermal injury, it allows regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissue. Such treatments are often used to treat skin disorders and conditions for aesthetic improvement.

Using controlled higher concentrations of AHAs, application to the skin for short times can achieve substantial desquamation (skin peeling). This renewal of skin cells is useful in anti-ageing, reducing hyperpigmentation and improving radiance. It is important to have a chemical peel conducted by an accredited dermatologist, to prevent uneven peeling and dermal wounding.

In contrast to other peeling agents, such as phenol or salicylic acid, most of the AHAs are nutritive and physiologic.

Pre-peeling preparation

According to Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre, to prepare the skin for a regeneration phase, pre-treatment is necessary. The cosmetic conditions most suitable for a chemical peel would be features of photo ageing, such as solar lentigines, sallowed complexions, rough and textured skin, fine lines or wrinkles, acne scarring or hyperpigmentation. Whilst most skin types can opt for an AHA chemical peel, it is imperative to first seek assessment by an accredited dermatologist who will cater the peel, such as the acid type, strength, frequency and duration, for variability of individual skin conditions. Performed properly by a trained dermatologist, risk of scarring from a chemical peel is drastically reduced. The level of expertise in administering peels ensures a good outcome.

Prior to the actual application of the chemical peel substance, the skin will need to be thoroughly cleansed to remove oil and debris before being rinsed and dried.

Treatment with Chemical Peel

The peeling agent (AHAs) will be applied on the skin using an applicator or a brush. The duration of allowing the peeling agent to be in contact with the skin varies according to the skin’s conditions as assessed by the dermatologist. With superficial peels, some sensation of heat and stinging may be experienced, before the peeling agent is neutralized (where applicable) and thoroughly cleansed off after the duration of contact recommended by the dermatologist. The chemical peel treatment is completed at our clinic with application of a hydrating Amino Acid Masque to soothe and calm the skin post-peel. Additional post peel care requires the use of sunscreens and other photoprotective agents, due to sun sensitivity post-treatment. It should be noted that regular application of sunscreen is advocated as it can reduce sun damage and aggravating of skin conditions.

How does a chemical peel work?

For superficial peels, the acid causes breakdown and decreases cohesiveness of corneocytes, that are found at the outermost part of the epidermis. Desquamation occurs, allowing renewal from lower epidermal layers. By weakening and ‘ungluing’ the cells in the inner stratum layer, it leads to uniform exfoliation of the outermost stratum layers.

With a low PH, most acid peels need to be properly neutralized to prevent acidification of the skin. To avoid burning, AHA peels are neutralized with basic salts such as sodium bicarbonate or sodium hydroxide.

A chemical peel does not compromise the barrier structure or integrity of the skin, as the mechanism of action of AHAs on the skin is a more targeted action for epidermal skin renewal.

Conclusion

As a treatment that improves skin texture and counters the effects of ageing, chemical peels continue to be relied on for various skin conditions. It is also safe for the skin and human health in general, as extensively tried and tested by dermatologist’s. A range of AHA formulations and concentrations are available for the dermatologist to administer therapy according to the patient’s requirements.

Speak to your dermatologist today for a tailored experience.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

—–

Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

Find Out If Men’s Skin Is Really Different from Women’s Skin

April 8, 2018

Most males are not that into cosmeceuticals. That is skincare with medical or drug-like benefits to improve skin health. Cosmeceuticals have a more relevant function than coloured cosmetics. Men have traditionally been uninterested in skin appearance, and only think of skincare as necessary when they face a specific skin concern – acne, oily skin, wrinkles or other topical skin conditions. Yes, using targeted skincare products are likely to help with these isolated issues, but having a daily skincare regime in place can avoid them completely.

Most skincare products used by men are likely to be purchased by women, even though most are unaware that male cosmeceuticals are distinct from those that females use. Many of the male products are created to address male facial hair, such as preshave treatments, shaving products and post-shave skin care. Yet, men’s skin is structurally different from females and knowing these differences can be a good place to start your skincare journey.

Oil control

Sebum production is also greater in males, this is mostly due to testosterone secretions. This can mean longer-lasting acne for men. The oil glands on our skin are more receptive towards testosterone, so it is no coincidence that we see males having oily skin more often than females.

Collagen content

We see signs of our skin ageing such as wrinkles and sagging skin as our collagen content decreases as we age. After our thirties, both men and women start to lose one per cent of our collagen each year. But for women, this loss escalates greatly in the first five years after menopause, explaining for why women experience skin ageing faster than men do.

Thickness of skin

Male skin is typically 20 to 30 per cent thicker than that of females. The presence of testosterone accounts for this difference. A man’s skin will continue to thin gradually with age, while a woman’s skin will only thin significantly after menopause. With a higher collagen density which is the ratio of collagen to the thickness of the skin, it explains why men tend to age slower than women of the same age. However, this difference may not be readily noticed as men are less active in protecting their skin from sun damage. The lack of habit in using sunscreen would allow UV radiation to add years to the skin.

That being said, the importance of sunscreen should be emphasized. The skincare product that we should all have is really the sunscreen. We know we are nagging, but please put on your sunscreen.

The skincare regime of male usually fits into either one of these options. They could be either be using soap and water only, or products that are targeted to men, or cherry pick a product from their partner. There are several main concerns with these options. Cherry picking products would likely result in using something that is not suited for men skin. Using gender-focused products may also not be effective as manufacturers typically employ stereotypes to target shoppers. Lastly, common soap and water are never sufficient for facial cleansing, simply because it causes your face to go into an alkaline state that can result in dryness (your skin should ideally be slightly acidic, at about pH of 5.5). Washing with a bar soap can pull all the water out of the skin, leaving your skin dehydrated and a buildup of dead skin cells.

Most men hope to have clean, fresh, clear and smooth skin. And the preferred approach to achieving healthier skin is to have minimal steps in their skincare routine. An ideal skincare routine should begin with a proper cleanser. (No soap and water, please!) Use a pea-sized amount of Miel Honey™ Cleanser and work it into a lather over the entire face. This is to facilitate the removal of sebum and debris. Use cold water as heat can be irritating to the skin. The lather from the Honey Cleanser also doubles up as a “shaving lotion”, lubricating the shave with anti bacterial Honey which thoroughly cleanses the skin without over-drying the jaw line shave areas that could be especially sensitive and prone to acne breakouts!

Sun exposure can damage your DNA, and cause wrinkling and skin cancer. Add SunProtector™ to your routine for daily application. With an SPF value of 50, it is sufficient to safeguard the skin from free radicals and keep it sun damage-free. UV radiation is a common culprit that compromises our skin’s integrity and can lead to sensitive skin or dryness. Developed in a research laboratory, this sunscreen is also formulated in-house for Singapore’s humid climate, so rest assured and lather on.

Keep your face moisturised with Radiancé Fluide™ Hydrating Emulsion. As you age, your skin cells will start losing the ability to retain as much moisture as before, as collagen levels decline over time. Deliver essential nutrients such as amino acids and oligopeptides to your skin with this moisturiser to keep your skin bright and healthy.

© 2017 twlskin.com. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, consultant dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

A Dermatologist’s Guide to Skin Resurfacing

February 9, 2018

What is skin resurfacing?

Regardless of the technique employed, skin resurfacing is a form of controlled, targeted injury to your skin. By stimulating your skin to heal from the injury, the new skin cells that form after would be smoother, tighter and more youthful. Skin resurfacing can be achieved through different techniques to treat different aspects of skin damage and conditions, mainly laser, dermabrasion and chemical peels.

Are you suitable for skin resurfacing?

These treatments can help skin that suffers from acne, damage from sun exposure, ageing effects, hyperpigmentation, scars and wrinkles. Any skin condition that you wish to treat likely has an appropriate treatment at your dermatologist, go for a professional diagnosis before having any skin resurfacing treatments done.

Chemical Peel

Before the peel, your face will be cleansed thoroughly to remove oil and to prep the skin for penetration. A gentle, medically formulated milk/fruit acid solution is applied, which removes the epidermis layer, allowing the acid to penetrate into the first layer of the dermis. Various acids can be used in different combinations to remove the surface layer of the skin. Note not all acids are the same nor are all chemical peels the same, best to have an accredited dermatologist assess and recommend the most suitable peel for your skin.

According to Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre, she says: “A chemical peel removes the damaged epidermis to reveal a brighter complexion. You may experience a warm sensation after the chemical application, and stinging when the peel is removed. Depending on the concentration of acids used, you may need some time to recover before resuming activities.”

Dermabrasion

To smoothen scars and wrinkles, dermabrasion is a surgical technique that uses anesthesia and/or a freezing agent before smoothening skin surface irregularities. With a high-speed rotating brush, the surface layer of the skin will be removed till ideal results are obtained.

Laser Resurfacing

A wand is passed over your skin and emits a pulse of high-intensity light to damage the surface layers of the skin. The different invisible wavelengths of light stimulates various layers of skin for rejuvenation. Shield goggles will be provided to protect your eyes during the treatment.

Two types of lasers are commonly used in laser resurfacing: carbon dioxide and erbium. Both lasers work to vaporize damaged skin cells in the epidermis.

What can I expect after the treatment?

Follow-up care is essential to ensure a smooth progress for skin healing and resurfacing. Patients may experience uneven pigmentation of the skin at the treated area after the treatment, but this effect will subside when the skin restores its original level of pigment. Meanwhile, sunscreen is an absolute must to protect the skin as chemical peels along with other resurfacing treatments will render your skin temporarily more sensitive to the sun. At this stage, it is also imperative to use skincare catered for sensitive skin, which are dermatologist-tested, to mitigate risk of irritation and flare ups during the course of recovery post-treatment.

© 2017 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

Anti-Ageing Eye Treatment with Nitrogen Plasma Technology

January 1, 2018

 

 

As a dermatologist, one of the first signs of ageing I observe shows in the eye area, what we call the peri-orbital or peri-ocular region. The commonest complaints I hear from my patients old or young are “Is there anything I can do for my eye bags, dark circles and eye wrinkles?” This is tricky because while so many spas, medi-spas, aesthetics providers and skincare companies confidently brag about their treatments erasing eye wrinkles and waving eyebags goodbye,  I often have to burst bubbles in my clinic when I tell my concerned patients their hopes may be misplaced in  a single miracle product which probably doesn’t exist.

In my practice, I use a multi-dimensional approach to work the aged eye area— a combination of skin resurfacing (plasma nitrogen over laser for sensitive areas such as the eye region), injectables like botulinum toxins, dysport and Botox. This, in conjunction with an eye cream that I formulate for my patients to use on a daily basis for before and after care, with specific active ingredients to brighten, tighten, moisturise and anti-age periorbital skin, besides being tested for safety and efficacy to complement medical aesthetics treatments around the eye area.

Men and women alike are affected by concerns of ageing and looking older, there’s nothing vain about wanting to look like a younger version of one’s self. In fact, it has been shown that your skin starts to age at around the age of 25. Main areas of wrinkles are at the forehead, nose, mouth and especially around the eyes. Eye wrinkles are often noticed first and more evident as the skin in this area is thinner, making it susceptible to wrinkling. Regardless of gender, you are prone to getting wrinkles so start taking care of your skin to maintain your youthful appearance!

 

What is Plasma Skin Regeneration?

It is a non-laser treatment that uses a device to convert nitrogen gas into plasma energy, to rejuvenate skin by improving facial lines, wrinkles and pigmentation caused by photoaging. This technology offers a wide variety of single pulse energy levels with different options of frequency that can most efficiently improve the precision of plasma delivery. This function allows accurate temperature irradiation to drastically improve topical drug delivery for a variety of dermatological indicators. Personalisation of settings to cater to different patients is available, as patients’ skin conditions differ in terms of downtime and receptivity to treatments. Through deep tissue re-modelling, the energy delivered by plasma skin regeneration is non-fractionated. This allows for even energy absorption, ensuring the consistency in treatments done to the skin. The high energy also supports significant skin tightening. With deep tissue re-modelling and accelerated healing, plasma skin regeneration usage is versatile and effective.

 

Plasma Delivery

  1. The handpiece first releases the nitrogen plasma pulses.
  2. This causes it to transfer thermal energy to the skin, allowing for controlled heating of the tissue.
  3. The controlled duration of the pulse and temperature then allows the treatment to happen optimally.
  4. This then leads to the possibility of treatments of many dermatological conditions due to the carefully controlled time frame.

 

Reliable Technology

Nitrogen plasma technology has been tested and backed by evidence. It has over 3 years of pre-clinical and clinical testing, 16 separate studies conducted, more than 450 clinical study treatments which proved to cause no scarring or pigmentation, and one year of clinical histology. This intense and detailed level of testing is uncommon in the industry, whilst clinically proven to perform skin resurfacing and regeneration using plasma energy.

Drug Delivery Effect

There are many treatable indicators like anti-aging effects, pore size reduction, wrinkle reduction, skin tightening, stretch marks reduction, acne scar reduction and more. However, one key effect is the drug delivery effect. When the skin is exposed to the nitrogen plasma, the permeability of the skin increases. This allows for better absorption of the drug, enhancing drug delivery and making the drug more effective during and after treatment.

 

Key Specialities

Advanced Technology

Plasma skin regeneration converts nitrogen gas into the fourth state of matter, plasma energy. It then emerges from the handpiece in controlled pulses and causes rapid heating of tissue. This allows for the transmission of thermal energy to the tissue.

Minimal Damage

The treated photodamaged skin layers undergo controlled thermal modification without additional harm. This allows for speedy healing and a natural layer of protection for the skin. At high temperature and energy, the skin epidermis breaks down and sheds, but only after a new healthier skin layer forms beneath. Plasma skin regeneration is non-invasive and will not cause any open wounds.

Treats the Whole Skin Structure

Plasma skin regeneration can treat the entire skin structure. It ensures that the entire skin surface is regenerated and produces conditions favourable for optimal results. It is associated with neocollagenesis and neoelastogenesis. Neocollagenesis is the process of making more collagen while elastogenesis refers to the mechanisms that drive elastic fiber formation for our skin.

Ideal for Eyelids Treatment

The skin around our eyes, our eyelids, are especially sensitive and thinner than the rest of our skin. Thus, not all treatments are suitable to prevent eye wrinkles and eye bags. However, plasma skin regeneration, with its precision safety and efficacy, is suitable for treatment of the eyelids to reduce wrinkles and achieve an anti-aging effect, whereas previous technologies might be less safe for sensitive thin eyelid areas or even deliver inconsistent and ineffective results. In addition, due to the significant skin tightening effect from skin regeneration, deepening of the eyelids (with a look of deeper-set double eyelids) is also achieved.

Long Lasting Effects

Plasma skin regeneration has been proven to show neocollagenesis and reduce elastosis (abnormal elastic tissue in the skin which is a result of excessive sun exposure). Elastosis can cause your skin to have wrinkles and even pigmentation. The nitrogen plasma technology has post treatment effects that can last for more than a year.

 

With its reliable and advanced technology, plasma skin regeneration can produce anti-aging and long-lasting effects with its non-invasive methods, helping you to achieve a bright and youthful appearance.

© 2017 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

 

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.