Tag Archive: collagen

Understanding the layers of your skin

July 14, 2018


Our skin is the largest organ in the body, and the most visible. Yet, few of us really understand how it works. When searching the internet for causes and treatments of our skin conditions, for example, we often come across terms like ‘epidermis’ and ‘dermis’ that are literally Greek and hard to understand.

As a result, it’s difficult to know exactly how to care for our skin. As our outer layer endures harsh external conditions such as environmental pollutants, UV rays, pressure, temperature, and others, how can we best protect and keep it in good health?

To answer this question, we need to start with a skin 101 primer.

Our epidermis

The outermost layer of the skin is known as the epidermis. It consists of four layers of closely packed cells. Skin cells found in these layers are called keratinocytes. They manufacture and store keratin which is the protein that makes up the main structure of our hair, skin and nails.

From deep to superficial, the four skin layers in the epidermis are stratum basale (deepest), stratum spinosum, stratum granulosum and stratum corneum (outermost).

In the epidermis of certain body parts with thicker skin, such as palms, soles and digits, there is an additional layer of cells called stratum lucidum. It is found wedged between the stratum corneum and the stratum granulosum.

The dermis

The dermis refers to the inner layer of skin found between the epidermis and subcutaneous (=under the skin) fat. The dermis layers are made of connective tissues, linked by interwoven fibres of collagen and elastin, packed in bundles.

Collagen takes up 70% of the weight of the dermis. Collagen fibers provides the skin with structural support and tensile strength. Collagen proteins also bind to water, keeping the skin well hydrated. Accounting for 2% of the weight of the dermis, elastin fibers allow movement and are responsible for the elasticity of the skin.

Caring for the skin we see

In the outermost layer, known as the stratum corneum, the keratinocytes are actually dead cells pushed up from deeper layers. As these cells travel to the surface, they undergo keratinization, the process whereby the contents of the cell develop tough keratin proteins. Other components such as cholesterol, ceramides and free fatty acids in the stratum corneum also work together to give a toughness to the skin that can withstand all sorts of chemical and mechanical insults.

In this way, the stratum corneum becomes a barrier that prevents dehydration of underlying tissues and serves as a mechanical protection for the more delicate layers below. It is also the layer most crucial in maintaining the skin’s moisture.

The stratum corneum layer is usually replaced with cell division and renewal in a cycle of 4 weeks.

Ageing and exposure to ultraviolet radiation can stress the skin, leading to poor skin barrier function and an increase in water loss. The barrier function can also be affected by other factors such as a deficiency in fatty acids and lipids, detergents (usually from harsh cleansers) or dehydration.

Caring for your skin then should involve a regimen of protecting it from the sun with UV protection, using cleaners and other products that do not dehydrate the skin, and maintaining the moisture in the skin through moisturizers. Cleansers, in particular, can contain harsh surfactants that emulsify to remove grease and dirt but can irritate the skin. Use a gentle cleanser with a natural emulsifier instead. For example, Dr TWL’s  Miel Honey™ Cleanser uses medical-grade honey as a natural emulsifier, leaving the skin both clean and gently moisturized.

Many cosmetic treatments work by causing a change in the epidermal layer, thereby encouraging it to renew itself faster. Procedures targeting the epidermis include some forms of chemical peelslasers, intense pulse light (IPL), microneedling or topical drugs.

Caring for the skin beneath

The dermis, the layer beneath the epidermis, gets thinner and loses its elasticity over time.

Various cosmetic treatments available often aim to restore the amount of collagen lost during the ageing process, such as medium and deep chemical peels, microneedling, microfocused ultrasound and ablative lasers. Fillers can also restore the volume of collagen in the dermis layer, correcting fine lines and wrinkles.

Lasers, IPL or resurfacing treatments can differ according to the skin layer that it targets – the epidermis or dermis layer. Non-ablative treatments focus on the dermis while leaving the epidermis intact. Ablative lasers treat both dermis and epidermis layers.

Chemical peels can reach different levels of the skin depending on the frequency, the peeling substance (typically an acid), the concentration of the substance, and skin condition of the patient. In a controlled manner, skin cells are destroyed in a chemical peel to stimulate regeneration of a smoother epidermis and new collagen in the dermis.

© 2018 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

 

Find Out If Men’s Skin Is Really Different from Women’s Skin

April 8, 2018

Most males are not that into cosmeceuticals. That is skincare with medical or drug-like benefits to improve skin health. Cosmeceuticals have a more relevant function than coloured cosmetics. Men have traditionally been uninterested in skin appearance, and only think of skincare as necessary when they face a specific skin concern – acne, oily skin, wrinkles or other topical skin conditions. Yes, using targeted skincare products are likely to help with these isolated issues, but having a daily skincare regime in place can avoid them completely.

Most skincare products used by men are likely to be purchased by women, even though most are unaware that male cosmeceuticals are distinct from those that females use. Many of the male products are created to address male facial hair, such as preshave treatments, shaving products and post-shave skin care. Yet, men’s skin is structurally different from females and knowing these differences can be a good place to start your skincare journey.

Oil control

Sebum production is also greater in males, this is mostly due to testosterone secretions. This can mean longer-lasting acne for men. The oil glands on our skin are more receptive towards testosterone, so it is no coincidence that we see males having oily skin more often than females.

Collagen content

We see signs of our skin ageing such as wrinkles and sagging skin as our collagen content decreases as we age. After our thirties, both men and women start to lose one per cent of our collagen each year. But for women, this loss escalates greatly in the first five years after menopause, explaining for why women experience skin ageing faster than men do.

Thickness of skin

Male skin is typically 20 to 30 per cent thicker than that of females. The presence of testosterone accounts for this difference. A man’s skin will continue to thin gradually with age, while a woman’s skin will only thin significantly after menopause. With a higher collagen density which is the ratio of collagen to the thickness of the skin, it explains why men tend to age slower than women of the same age. However, this difference may not be readily noticed as men are less active in protecting their skin from sun damage. The lack of habit in using sunscreen would allow UV radiation to add years to the skin.

That being said, the importance of sunscreen should be emphasized. The skincare product that we should all have is really the sunscreen. We know we are nagging, but please put on your sunscreen.

The skincare regime of male usually fits into either one of these options. They could be either be using soap and water only, or products that are targeted to men, or cherry pick a product from their partner. There are several main concerns with these options. Cherry picking products would likely result in using something that is not suited for men skin. Using gender-focused products may also not be effective as manufacturers typically employ stereotypes to target shoppers. Lastly, common soap and water are never sufficient for facial cleansing, simply because it causes your face to go into an alkaline state that can result in dryness (your skin should ideally be slightly acidic, at about pH of 5.5). Washing with a bar soap can pull all the water out of the skin, leaving your skin dehydrated and a buildup of dead skin cells.

Most men hope to have clean, fresh, clear and smooth skin. And the preferred approach to achieving healthier skin is to have minimal steps in their skincare routine. An ideal skincare routine should begin with a proper cleanser. (No soap and water, please!) Use a pea-sized amount of Miel Honey™ Cleanser and work it into a lather over the entire face. This is to facilitate the removal of sebum and debris. Use cold water as heat can be irritating to the skin. The lather from the Honey Cleanser also doubles up as a “shaving lotion”, lubricating the shave with anti bacterial Honey which thoroughly cleanses the skin without over-drying the jaw line shave areas that could be especially sensitive and prone to acne breakouts!

Sun exposure can damage your DNA, and cause wrinkling and skin cancer. Add SunProtector™ to your routine for daily application. With an SPF value of 50, it is sufficient to safeguard the skin from free radicals and keep it sun damage-free. UV radiation is a common culprit that compromises our skin’s integrity and can lead to sensitive skin or dryness. Developed in a research laboratory, this sunscreen is also formulated in-house for Singapore’s humid climate, so rest assured and lather on.

Keep your face moisturised with Radiancé Fluide™ Hydrating Emulsion. As you age, your skin cells will start losing the ability to retain as much moisture as before, as collagen levels decline over time. Deliver essential nutrients such as amino acids and oligopeptides to your skin with this moisturiser to keep your skin bright and healthy.

© 2017 twlskin.com. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, consultant dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

All You Need To Know About Vitamin C

January 11, 2018

 

Vitamin C is likely to be no stranger to any of us, we see it present in plenty of fruits and vegetables like oranges, grapefruits or pineapple. Yet, it is rather new to most of us to have Vitamin C on our face. This obsession with Vitamin C could be why you are googling up on this ingredient now, and we are about to tell you.

The vitamin brings benefits to the skin that we love: antioxidative, photoprotective, antiaging, and anti-pigmentary effects.

Vitamin C in our body

Vitamin C is the most abundant antioxidant in human skin. Antioxidants work to reduce the damage that free radicals can bring to our skin cells. We are unable to synthesize vitamin C as we do not have the enzyme needed to do so. Even as we consume high doses of vitamin C supplements, only a small fraction of the vitamin will remain in our body and skin cells. This brings us to rely on external supplements, with topical application being the most common form.

What should the concentration of my Vitamin C be?

When choosing a Vitamin C product, you may come across the different concentrations available. Of what percentage of the Vitamin C should we be using? That really depends on the type of Vitamin C in use. Conventional Vitamin C derivatives such as Ascorbic Acid may require 10 to 20 percent to have any reasonable efficacy, and is limited inherently by the fact that higher concentrations, for instance above 20 percent, may cause irritation to the skin. On the other hand, studies have shown that a mere 1 percent concentration of Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate – considered to be a new generation of Vitamin C derivatives, has strong antimicrobial efficacy against acne.

What are the common forms of Vitamin C?

Out of all the various forms of Vitamin C, L-ascorbic acid is conventionally recognised as one of the most biologically active molecules. This compound is likely to be found at a pH below 3.5 for greater stability and permeability. Above that, the acid becomes very unstable in aqueous solutions and is prone to immediate oxidation, turning to a brown colour when oxidized.

Other formulations of vitamin C are magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, ascorbyl-6-palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate. These formulations are stable at neutral pH of 7. As a water-soluble derivative of Vitamin C, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate is more stable in water but less potent than L-Ascorbic acid.

Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate is one of the most stable and effective forms of Vitamin C. As it will not oxidize as easily, it is a preferable choice for skin care formulations. A well-formulated product allows sodium ascorbyl phosphate to penetrate the skin epidermis without causing irritation. You may consider a dermatologist-formulated product such as Vita C Gold™ Seruma Vitamin C formulation that has been tested for bio-activity in a laboratory, for safe and effective results.

Different formulations of Vitamin C exists, and you may decide which forms would be preferable in your skincare by weighing in on the cost, potency, texture or formulation. Although the conventional L-ascorbic acid is perhaps the most potent derivative of Vitamin C, it oxidizes too quickly when exposed to oxygen to be much efficacy on the skin. One may prefer newer Vitamin C derivatives – Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, which are much more stable and able to deliver better efficacy even at lower concentrations.

Vitamin C helps to produce collagen

Vitamin C is required by our bodies to produce collagen, making this vitamin crucial for anti-ageing. Think of it as an anti-ageing shield your skin needs to reduce the damage your skin suffered, and also to prevent future damage. The vitamin facilitates enzymes that lead to the stability of collagen fibers. It also increases expression of collagen and synthesizes inhibitors to block enzymes from degrading collagen.

Vitamin C has anti-pigmentary effect

Vitamin C plays an important role in skin-lightening, as it inhibits an enzyme called tyrosinase. This enzyme works by converting tyrosine into melanin, so by reducing the activity of tyrosinase, our skin cells produce less melanin. 

Should I DIY my own Vitamin C serum?

According to Dr Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre, she says: “Concocting your own serum of Vitamin C can be dangerous as it can lead to phytophotodermatitis, a condition where itchy blisters and reddened patches appear on the exposed skin. The redness and blistering will settle down in a few days, but it leaves pigmentation at the same sites. Phytophotodermatitis results from the action of UV radiation on a plant chemical called furocoumarins. Citrus fruits such as lemon, lime or bergamot oranges are often responsible for the reaction.”

It is best to avoid DIY recipes for Vitamin C or you may end up with rashes that scar for a long time.

© 2017 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anti-Ageing Eye Treatment with Nitrogen Plasma Technology

January 1, 2018

 

 

As a dermatologist, one of the first signs of ageing I observe shows in the eye area, what we call the peri-orbital or peri-ocular region. The commonest complaints I hear from my patients old or young are “Is there anything I can do for my eye bags, dark circles and eye wrinkles?” This is tricky because while so many spas, medi-spas, aesthetics providers and skincare companies confidently brag about their treatments erasing eye wrinkles and waving eyebags goodbye,  I often have to burst bubbles in my clinic when I tell my concerned patients their hopes may be misplaced in  a single miracle product which probably doesn’t exist.

In my practice, I use a multi-dimensional approach to work the aged eye area— a combination of skin resurfacing (plasma nitrogen over laser for sensitive areas such as the eye region), injectables like botulinum toxins, dysport and Botox. This, in conjunction with an eye cream that I formulate for my patients to use on a daily basis for before and after care, with specific active ingredients to brighten, tighten, moisturise and anti-age periorbital skin, besides being tested for safety and efficacy to complement medical aesthetics treatments around the eye area.

Men and women alike are affected by concerns of ageing and looking older, there’s nothing vain about wanting to look like a younger version of one’s self. In fact, it has been shown that your skin starts to age at around the age of 25. Main areas of wrinkles are at the forehead, nose, mouth and especially around the eyes. Eye wrinkles are often noticed first and more evident as the skin in this area is thinner, making it susceptible to wrinkling. Regardless of gender, you are prone to getting wrinkles so start taking care of your skin to maintain your youthful appearance!

 

What is Plasma Skin Regeneration?

It is a non-laser treatment that uses a device to convert nitrogen gas into plasma energy, to rejuvenate skin by improving facial lines, wrinkles and pigmentation caused by photoaging. This technology offers a wide variety of single pulse energy levels with different options of frequency that can most efficiently improve the precision of plasma delivery. This function allows accurate temperature irradiation to drastically improve topical drug delivery for a variety of dermatological indicators. Personalisation of settings to cater to different patients is available, as patients’ skin conditions differ in terms of downtime and receptivity to treatments. Through deep tissue re-modelling, the energy delivered by plasma skin regeneration is non-fractionated. This allows for even energy absorption, ensuring the consistency in treatments done to the skin. The high energy also supports significant skin tightening. With deep tissue re-modelling and accelerated healing, plasma skin regeneration usage is versatile and effective.

 

Plasma Delivery

  1. The handpiece first releases the nitrogen plasma pulses.
  2. This causes it to transfer thermal energy to the skin, allowing for controlled heating of the tissue.
  3. The controlled duration of the pulse and temperature then allows the treatment to happen optimally.
  4. This then leads to the possibility of treatments of many dermatological conditions due to the carefully controlled time frame.

 

Reliable Technology

Nitrogen plasma technology has been tested and backed by evidence. It has over 3 years of pre-clinical and clinical testing, 16 separate studies conducted, more than 450 clinical study treatments which proved to cause no scarring or pigmentation, and one year of clinical histology. This intense and detailed level of testing is uncommon in the industry, whilst clinically proven to perform skin resurfacing and regeneration using plasma energy.

Drug Delivery Effect

There are many treatable indicators like anti-aging effects, pore size reduction, wrinkle reduction, skin tightening, stretch marks reduction, acne scar reduction and more. However, one key effect is the drug delivery effect. When the skin is exposed to the nitrogen plasma, the permeability of the skin increases. This allows for better absorption of the drug, enhancing drug delivery and making the drug more effective during and after treatment.

 

Key Specialities

Advanced Technology

Plasma skin regeneration converts nitrogen gas into the fourth state of matter, plasma energy. It then emerges from the handpiece in controlled pulses and causes rapid heating of tissue. This allows for the transmission of thermal energy to the tissue.

Minimal Damage

The treated photodamaged skin layers undergo controlled thermal modification without additional harm. This allows for speedy healing and a natural layer of protection for the skin. At high temperature and energy, the skin epidermis breaks down and sheds, but only after a new healthier skin layer forms beneath. Plasma skin regeneration is non-invasive and will not cause any open wounds.

Treats the Whole Skin Structure

Plasma skin regeneration can treat the entire skin structure. It ensures that the entire skin surface is regenerated and produces conditions favourable for optimal results. It is associated with neocollagenesis and neoelastogenesis. Neocollagenesis is the process of making more collagen while elastogenesis refers to the mechanisms that drive elastic fiber formation for our skin.

Ideal for Eyelids Treatment

The skin around our eyes, our eyelids, are especially sensitive and thinner than the rest of our skin. Thus, not all treatments are suitable to prevent eye wrinkles and eye bags. However, plasma skin regeneration, with its precision safety and efficacy, is suitable for treatment of the eyelids to reduce wrinkles and achieve an anti-aging effect, whereas previous technologies might be less safe for sensitive thin eyelid areas or even deliver inconsistent and ineffective results. In addition, due to the significant skin tightening effect from skin regeneration, deepening of the eyelids (with a look of deeper-set double eyelids) is also achieved.

Long Lasting Effects

Plasma skin regeneration has been proven to show neocollagenesis and reduce elastosis (abnormal elastic tissue in the skin which is a result of excessive sun exposure). Elastosis can cause your skin to have wrinkles and even pigmentation. The nitrogen plasma technology has post treatment effects that can last for more than a year.

 

With its reliable and advanced technology, plasma skin regeneration can produce anti-aging and long-lasting effects with its non-invasive methods, helping you to achieve a bright and youthful appearance.

© 2017 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, an accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

 

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

HIFU Sygmalift vs Ultherapy

December 15, 2017

People have been increasingly conscious about aging and the effects of aging on appearance. Skin aging will cause facial wrinkles and decreased collagen. Maintaining a youthful appearance seems to be the trend and many have resorted to skin treatments. There are many treatments like chemical peels, fractional laser and more but recently, ultrasound has been used in new treatments. HIFU and ultherapy are examples of ultrasound treatments. It has been introduced as non-invasive and effective in having anti-aging effects on the skin.

 

What is High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Sygmalift?

High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound also known as HIFU Sygmalift, is used for rejuvenation, lifting and tightening of the facial skin. Research has been done to demonstrate the efficacy of HIFU Sygmalift. It has been found that HIFU Sygmalift is a safe and effective method for facial skin tightening. It can be used not only to improve skin texture, but also contour the upper arms, knees and thighs. Besides facial skin, it can be used for other parts of your body.

How does HIFU Sygmalift work?

HIFU mainly causes cellular damage and reduces volume of the designated area by coagulation and generating instant microthermal lesions. This is done by using high frequency ultrasound waves targeted at the tissue area without causing any damage to the skin epidermis and surrounding tissues. The targeted skin tissues get heated up which causes cells to be activated, generating new collagen to produce a skin lifting and anti-aging effect.

 

What is Ultherapy?

Ultherapy is a new Food Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatment that tightens and lift facial skin. The treatment is mainly for the eyebrow, chin and neck area but can be used anywhere where the skin is lacking tightening. Follow up treatments are recommended once a year to maintain the effects. The procedure has been used as it is non invasive and hence does not require anesthetic or sedation. However, it has been said to be painful and it would be better for some to use local anesthetic. It has been said to have no foreign substances or drastic changes but achieves to improve the health of the cells beneath your skin surface to result in a subtle, natural and healthy effect on the outside.

How does Ultherapy work?

Ultherapy is different from the common laser techniques that target the outer layer of the skin. It penetrates the surface and transmits energy to the deeper skin layers. This way, it causes damage to the collagen layers to stimulate more collagen production as the cells are tricked into repairing the collagen. It uses ultrasound technology which has been used in fat burning treatments. With collagen production, it produces skin tightening and anti aging effects.

 

How are HIFU Sygmalift and Ultherapy different?

HIFU Sygmalift and Ultherapy sound similar in terms of their methodology. Both use ultrasound treatment, a popular choice for non invasive and non-surgical face lifting and tightening treatments. Their main goal is to produce anti-aging effects, helping you to preserve your youthful look. However, there are still some small differences between the two which can impact your decision is choosing the most suitable treatment.

Extent of Pain

One of the main complaints about ultherapy treatment is that it is known to be painful and some people require local anesthetic. However, HIFU Sygmalift is mainly painless because it uses fractionated HIFU. Instead of traditional HIFU techniques which use one concentrated beam, HIFU Sygmalift breaks up the beam into fractions and penetrates the skin at precise extents. People who use HIFU Sygmalift may feel a small sense of tolerable pain but it is definitely less painful that Ultherapy.

Extent of Skin Penetration

HIFU Sygmalift targets the dermis and connective tissues to stimulate collagen production. Meanwhile, Ultherapy can penetrate deeper even into the muscle tissues, which is why some people feel pain. However, both result in skin tightening and lifting effects.

Post Treatment Maintenance

For Ultherapy, most people may see visible results even after the first or second session. To follow-up, they are recommended to go for treatments once a year to maximise the effects. On the other hand, HIFU Sygmalift is used once a month to maintain your skin. Patients of HIFU Sygmalift are recommended to use anti-aging products that contains peptides to complement the treatment, supporting a gentler type of treatment.

 

Both HIFU Sygmalift and Ultherapy use similar technology and methods with very subtle differences. However, these differences can make a big impact on your comfort with the treatments. Both methods are still safe, striving to produce anti-aging effects on your skin. With the similarities and differences explained, you can now make the best decision for yourself and choose the treatment that suits you the most.

 

© 2017 TWL Specialist Skin and Laser Centre. All rights reserved.

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, accredited dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, for a thorough consultation to determine the most suitable treatment for your skin.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.

Singapore Dermatologist Talks Skincare Tips – A Review of Beauty Supplements

October 4, 2017

By Dr. Teo Wan Lin, Consultant Dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre

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The Science and Myth of Nutricosmetics

In the last decade, the beauty and cosmetic industry has churned out collagen-boosting oral supplements one after the other that claims to boost collagen with a dose of an edible capsule. They boast fish-derived peptides, collagen, carotenoids amongst a host of anti-oxidant ingredients that claim to anti-age, reduce wrinkles and improve glow. Dermatologists have called these nutraceuticals or nutricosmetics. In my article, I will break down the science and the myth(s) behind these to shed light on the latest dietary supplement that’s supposed to work wonders for your skin and how you can evaluate it for yourself. In the first of a series, I shall discuss a dermatologist’s take on collagen and fish peptide supplements that have been popularised in the beauty and cosmetic industry.

1. What are nutraceuticals or nutricosmetics?

A nutraceutical is a pharmaceutical-grade and standardized nutrient. The FDA and the Health Sciences Authority of Singapore does not recognise nutraceuticals or nutricosmetics as a regulatory category. Rather, they are regulated as food additives and dietary supplements.

2. Do collagen or peptide containing supplements actually promote healthy skin?

These beauty supplements are consumed like food substances and hence they get digested and then absorbed by the body. One recent study showed that in individuals taking a daily supplement containing collagen peptides, there was a reduction in eye wrinkle depth after eight weeks of taking the supplements. However, dermatologists internationally who spearhead the research and testing of cosmetic dermatology caution that overall there is no substantial body of evidence in the realm of dermatological research to support the use of fish-derived peptides or collagen to boost skin health. Ingested collagen/peptide supplements are digested in the same way as food is taken as part of a normal diet and absorbed similarly, with no specific therapeutic benefit to skin or ability to be delivered directly to skin for its effects.

3. Is there any way at all to ensure that they reach our skin ?
Collagen is a protein found in skin and other tissues, there is no evidence that ingested collagen boosts the amount of collagen in the skin tissues as the body breaks down food/supplements similarly in the digestive tract and edible collagen itself has no medicinal/therapeutic benefit. Collagen in the skin is made by specialised skin cells known as fibroblasts. With age and sun damage, this process is slowed down. Dermatologists use a combination of lasers, chemical peels and cosmeceuticals to increase collagen production in one’s skin by stimulating one’s collagen receptors, rather than applying collagen to the skin or by consuming collagen. Collagen itself is a large molecule that cannot be absorbed through the skin surface. Collagen hydrolysates(such as fish peptides) have some early evidence in laboratory studies to have some UV-protective and anti-ageing properties in skin but more research needs to be done.

© 2017 Dr. Teo Wan Lin. All rights reserved. 

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Meet with Dr. Teo Wan Lin, founder and Specialist Consultant Dermatologist of TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre, an accredited dermatologist specialising in medical and aesthetic dermatology. She integrates her artistic sensibility with her research background and specialist dermatologist training, by means of customised, evidence-based aesthetic treatments using state-of the-art machines, injectables (fillers and toxins) which work synergistically with her proprietary line of specialist dermatologist grade cosmeceuticals Dr.TWL Dermaceuticals.

To book an appointment with Dr. Teo, call us at +65 6355 0522, or email appt@twlskin.com. Alternatively, you may fill up our contact form here.