Tag Archive: skincare products

Common Skincare Myths Revealed by a Dermatologist

January 4, 2021

There has been a lot of skincare advice thrown around the internet- but not all of it is good. In fact, some of these “advice” may be harmful to your skin. It’s time to clear the air and put these skincare myths to rest, so that you can start making informed decisions when it comes to your skin.

In this article, we will reveal the truth behind common skincare myths, share dermatologist recommendations on skincare products, and include excerpts from Skincare Bible: Dermatologist’s Tips for Cosmeceutical Skincare by Dr. Teo Wan Lin, dermatologist at TWL Specialist Skin & Laser Centre.

Skincare Myth #1: Skin problems like pigmentation, acne and sensitive skin can be treated with skincare products and facials

Almost every brand is boasting a special cleanser or cream that can treat these problems over the counter, be it in the form of lightening cleansers or anti-acne cleansers or anti-redness creams. The truth is, healthy skin can be maintained with cosmeceutical skincare recommended by dermatologists, but when you have any one of these issues, they are actually true medical conditions of the skin.

My advice is, if you have any of these symptoms, stop self-medicating and applying a bunch of anti-redness or “sensitive skin” products. See a dermatologist as soon as you can because all of the above can be promptly treated with proper medications. This will probably save you a lot of pain, money and regret in the medium to long term.

I have seen so many patients who have spent thousands of dollars on online supplements, fad diets, facials at spas or aesthetic centres, did not get better and actually had a true dermatological condition, such as perioral dermatitis (which looks like acne, for example, but occurs in adults) and rosacea which can be effectively treated by a dermatologist with the correct medications.


Skincare Myth #2: Scrub and use a clay mask.

Dermatologists do not agree with a lot of what beauty companies/aesthetics providers are telling the public. Dermatologists have seen way too many complications because of an incomplete understanding of the actual science of how skin behaves. Scrubbing with harsh beady grains of sand would work if your skin was made of wood, if you imagine using it like a sandpaper. In reality, you do not brighten or “exfoliate’’ your skin with that; rather, you are causing damage and irritation to your skin, that’s maybe even the cause of your sensitive skin and red face problems.

Clay masks are also totally unnecessary, even for oily and acne-prone skin types because it’s actually the salicylic acid content in these masks that causes your acne to get better, but not without really dehydrating your skin after that and causing facial eczema in the long term. Yes it is possible to have oily acne prone skin and facial eczema at the same time.

Dermatologists do not prescribe clay masks for any skin problem because there are much more effective options for treatment of oily skin and acne. What counts in a skin treatment product is the active ingredient in these masks and products, so again, so, do thorough brand research, check the ingredient list of your next bottle or just go with what your dermatologist would recommend.

Skincare myth: clay masks. Use a polysaccharide mask instead.

The MoistureMax Skin Healing Polysaccharide Facial Mask has a unique porous structure that traps cosmeceutical active ingredients in mini-reservoirs within the mask, with enhanced delayed release of cosmeceuticals with minimal transepidermal water loss.

The Silkpeel Home Medi-facial Kit is a home chemical peel equivalent. The effects of the SilkPeel Home Facial Peel System are that of microdermabrasion which has a similar effect to microscopic skin exfoliation.

“Glass skin, a poreless appearance of the skin, popularised by K-beauty isn’t a myth. Cosmeceuticals such as polyglutamic acid, which is a large molecule, sits on the surface of the skin while functioning as a humectant 5x more effective than hyaluronic acid. The SilkPeel system utiliizes polyglutamic acid based solutions with potent antioxidants delivered via vacuum microdermabrasion that helps to achieve a translucent appearance of the skin, reducing the appearance of pores,” accredited dermatologist, Dr. Teo Wan Lin.

Skincare Myth #3: Lower SPF coverage is fine, since SPF represents the duration of sun protection, not the quality.

I read this in a beauty magazine about an aesthetic doctor’s sunscreen product  and honestly this is the sort of stuff that would make a dermatologist cringe, because it is dangerous to spread this sort of belief and sun protection isn’t just about beauty but also skin cancers. It is very enticing  given our humid climate when such brands promise that their sun protection mist offers lightweight cover without leaving a white stain.

Skin cancer can be avoided with good sun protection. In fact, you should never go without a good sunscreen because the harmful sun rays is also the number one cause of ageing. However, beware of the dangers of misleading labels on sunscreens. You should go for a sunscreen recommended by your dermatologist that is at least SPF 30.

A sunscreen should effectively block both UVB and UVA rays, which is possible with an agent that has an SPF of 30 or greater. It is also important that your sunscreen is labeled with the term “broad spectrum”, which means it protects your skin against UVA rays. There are differences between 15, 30, and 50.  SPF is measured in the laboratories whereby the amounts applied at 2g/cm2 and this never happens in real life.

And on top of that, most of us don’t apply sunscreen properly. SPF (sun protection factor) is derived by taking the time it takes you to burn with sunscreen on and dividing it by the time taken for you to burn without sunscreen on. SPF specifically protects against ultraviolet B (UVB) rays that cause sunburn. I would recommend a minimum of SPF 30 for an everyday sunscreen and SPF 50 when outdoors for extended periods of time.

The SunProtector is SPF 50/PA+++ and is exquisitely formulated for humid climates. It is a broad-spectrum sunscreen that also regenerates and soothes sensitive skin. Designed with unique pigments blended to be almost invisible under make-up.

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On Fillers and Vaccines, and Safe Aesthetic Treatments

December 29, 2020

The following is a transcript from Dr. Teo Wan Lin’s podcast, Dermatologist Talks: Science of Beauty on fillers and vaccines. Subscribe to her podcast on a journey to discover the science of beauty. We’ll cover the science behind active ingredients and get deep into the cosmetic formulations. Stay on trend with the latest on botanical actives, technology and be part of our FUTURE OF BEAUTY.


29 DEC 2020: Hi guys, this is Dr. Teo Wan Lin, and welcome to this week’s dermatology flash briefing. The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine apparently causes swelling and inflammation in patients with cosmetic facial fillers. The FDA advisory committee reviewing the new Moderna vaccine, has come out to state this very specific side effect that has involved several trial participants who have had cosmetic facial fillers. I want to just quickly share with you guys today what exactly this is about, how it occurs, and if that’s something we ought to be worried about.

What exactly are dermal fillers?

Dermal fillers are used primarily for facial augmentation. The filling agents are meant to restore fullness in one’s appearance that could be lost over time with age as a result of subcutaneous fat atrophy, or a side effect of certain medications such as retroviral medications. The ideal facial filler should have the following properties: first of all, it should have physiologic compatibility with your body – meaning that it readily incorporates itself with your tissues. It should be free of complications or side effects, and ideally, it doesn’t degrade with time. But this is, of course, untrue for the commonest type of facial filler which is used in most cosmetic practices – that would be hyaluronic acid based and they should be relatively easy to administer. You also have alternatives such as those that are collagen based, or hydroxylapatite based – for example, Sculptra is from poly l lactic acid.

What are the side effects of facial fillers?

In terms of the known side effects from using these facial fillers as injectables, some of the common complications that occur would be tenderness, bleeding, bruising. When lumps and nodules occur, this can be because of inappropriate injection techniques, or accumulation of the filler in a more superficial location than expected.

So what’s the deal with the fillers and vaccines?

Now what’s happening with the Moderna vaccine and this painful facial swelling that occurs where facial fillers have been previously injected, its best thought of as an allergic reaction, or basically an immunological reaction. The key thing here is the process of injecting a vaccine, essentially causes the immune system to be stimulated. That in turn results in the body recognizing that the facial filler in that case, is not a part of the body tissues, and the body starts to mount an immunological reaction against it. Based on the cases that were reported to the FDA, the profile of these patients essentially had swelling and inflammation in the area that was administered the filler. A couple of the patients had the cheek filler 6 months prior to the vaccine, and one patient had lip filler done just 2 days after the vaccine. In all of these scenarios, the patients were treated with oral steroids, anti-histamines, and was observed that their reaction resolved.

What exactly is an allergic reaction?

Typically it is considered a medical event due to an immune system respond to a perceived allergen. It is not likely that these individuals would have developed this response had they not been given the vaccine. The reason is because facial fillers are medically engineered to be biocompatible, but in the case where you’ve had a vaccine, your immune system will start to detect that these substances that were injected, are actually not part of your body tissues.

What are your thoughts, as a dermatologist?

As a dermatologist, I have some opinions with regards to the observation of these adverse events. First of all, we do expect that massive rollout of vaccinations against the COVID19 virus is expected to be happening internationally, and I feel that it is a very important part in ensuring that we get some level of control and immunity in a very severe pandemic like COVID 19. In terms of immunological reactions that are occurring in response to facial fillers in this case, we note that the attendings have actually treated these patients with oral steroids.

We know that oral steroids suppress your immune system, and in fact, make you more vulnerable to the virus. Personally, I have not given oral steroids as far as possible to many of my patients in the last few months. For patients who otherwise would have benefitted from steroid therapy for chronic inflammatory disorders such as severe eczema, I have certainly been a lot more cautious in terms of exploring other therapies before using oral steroids. The reason is because it’s been known to worsen the prognosis in the event you do get COVID, and also, because it reduces your body’s natural immune system response – you’re going to be more susceptible to catching COVID.

The answer is not an easy one. Facial fillers are used in millions of people internationally, and it is not as if it is the first time we are hearing of an adverse reaction. Another known complication from facial filler injections that is relevant in the context of the modern vaccine would be non-allergic inflammatory responses- we call these granulomatous reactions. These don’t occur so quickly, and we right now have no long term data as to what the vaccination would do in terms of individuals who are going to have fillers or have had fillers, and who are going to receive the vaccine.

What are granulomatous reactions?

These granulomatous reactions are usually non-painful lumps, and it is all a part of inflammation that is caused by the immune system being stimulated. In fact, in 2017, there was a case report about a granulomatous reaction to a dermal filler that was hyaluronic acid based in the Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy. A granulomatous reaction is a delayed onset inflammatory nodule that is usually painless, that occurs much later than the so-called allergic reaction in individuals who have painful swellings, such as those who have received the Moderna vaccine and found that the site of the facial filler injection previously became painful. The key thing here is that in order for us to diagnose a granulomatous reaction, it’s going to take a longitudinal study for as long as 5 years before we can determine if it was truly a problem in individuals who received the vaccine, and also had the facial filler injected.

In 2015, in the Journal of Dermatologic Surgery, there was a series whereby the author conducted a retrospective chart review of patients who were treated with HA fillers, within a 5 year period, to evaluate for delayed onset nodules. The conclusion was that although they are pretty uncommon, it is important to be aware of this side effect, and to have a management protocol in place. In their conclusion, the authors also said that from the patients responses and from the literature, that these nodules are immune-mediated in nature.

What I’m trying to say is that because we are currently in an unprecedented public health situation internationally, where we have a raging pandemic that’s deadly, we may have to reconsider the risk that we might be taking with aesthetic treatments. Now, I do perform facial filler and botox injections, but the truth is, vaccinations are going to be a priority for most people and most countries in order for us to get the pandemic under control. I feel that the public should realize that we are also not going to be 100% certain how these facial fillers will further on be affected by these vaccines -for example, the development of granulomatous reactions. The truth is, if you already had a facial filler, I certainly don’t think that should deter you from getting a vaccines because these are established complications. If you do have it then, visit an accredited dermatologist who will be able to diagnose it accurately and will be able to treat it.

A word of caution here, not all painful filler related swellings are due to an immunologic response to the vaccine, depending on the characteristics observed during clinical examination, your dermatologist will also evaluate you for other differential diagnoses which may also include atypical infections. These are usually a result of poor aseptic technique, which introduces environmental bacteria into the deeper tissues.

Final thoughts

Overall, my two cents is that if you are thinking of getting a facial filler, as a dermatologist, I feel that you certainly can wait. The reason is really because the cost of human life in this pandemic, simply outweighs any other considerations that one may have.

The human facial structure is a composite of skin (the epidermis and dermis) the subcutaneous fat, the SMAS layer, the muscle and ageing affects all these structures dynamically, fillers only address one part of the ageing equation – restoration of volume. In terms of restoring facial structure and facial sagging – which can be corrected with other technologies such as: radiofrequency, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, which do not involve injection of other substances into your body tissues. A board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon will be able to advise you on these options.

The CollagenUp Facial Wand is a FDA approved device that includes cleansing + treatment + toning + radiofrequency + red photon + blue photon + EMS functions for the ultimate home-based skin rejuvenation system.

Advances in our understanding of textile cosmeceuticals in the form of polysaccharides, polymers and nanoparticle materials can create an optimal skin microenvironment that stimulates collagen production, improving the hydration of the stratum corneum that creates plumpness and firmness of the skin.

Fillers and vaccines - filler alternative

Application of the Qraser Cosmeceutical Transdermal Delivery Patch optimises skin healing microenvironment to regulate healthy collagen production, reducing wrinkles.

Vaccines and fillers - filler alternative

The MoistureMax™ Skin Healing Polysaccharide Facial Mask has a unique porous structure that traps cosmeceutical active ingredients in mini-reservoirs within the mask, with enhanced delayed release of cosmeceuticals with minimal transepidermal water loss.

In conclusion, if you’ve had a facial filler before, don’t let that deter you from getting the vaccine, as the cost of human life is much greater and this is a known filler complication (definitely enhanced by the vaccine) but the benefits will outweigh the risks. If you ARE thinking of getting fillers done, my personal opinion is that you may wish to consider alternatives, given the current context of our pandemic.

Vaccines and fillers Science of beauty podcast

This article contains excerpts taken from Dr. Teo Wan Lin’s podcast Episode 10 ‘On Fillers, the COVID-19 Vaccine & Safe Aesthetic Treatments’ Subscribe to the podcast here.
© Dr. Teo Wan Lin 2020

Ring Finger: A Singapore Dermatologist Discusses Why It Is The Best For Applying Skincare Products

August 29, 2019

WHY YOU SHOULD APPLY YOUR SKINCARE PRODUCTS WITH YOUR RING FINGER

How we apply our skincare is very important. Have you ever wondered why most skincare brands recommend in their product directions to use the ring finger and not any other fingers in applying and gently massaging the product unto your skin especially when it involves the eye area? That is because out of our 5 fingers, our ring finger is said to have the weakest touch. The manner on how you massage your face while cleansing it and how you apply your skincare and makeup products, even just simply scratching it or wiping it can add up to protecting the quality of your skin.

Our skin is very delicate and we want to avoid excessively tugging it whenever we apply our skincare or makeup products because this can cause our skin to show early signs of ageing. Applying with our ring finger gives an equal amount of pressure when applying products. You can easily cause wrinkles with too much pressure, and our ring finger is recommended for the least amount of pressure and pull.

Most especially when it comes to applying eye creams, using our ring finger is the best. The skin around our eyes is the most delicate among the rest, and it is most commonly the first to show the earliest sign of ageing. Mishandling of the skin around our eyes like aggressive removal of eye makeup and heavily dragging eye care products and any other skincare product unto our skin can cause eye wrinkles, crow’s feet, and other skin irritations.

That being said, no matter how the ring finger is said to be the lightest, we still have to be mindful whenever we use it to come into contact with our skin. Same with any other finger. Always work your serums, eye creams, and any other product into your skin using light, tapping motions making sure to avoid rubbing and tugging. No matter how expensive your skincare product is, the manner on how you apply it will tell how to get the most out of it.

 

HOW TO APPLY YOUR SKINCARE- EYE CREAM

Ever looked in the mirror and thought “My eye wrinkles are becoming more obvious each day”?

The Elixir-V™ Eyes is an eye cream that is meant to prevent dark eye circles, excessive puffiness of the eyes and eye wrinkles. Like the Elixir-V serum, it contains potent oligopeptides used for lifting and repair and our signature Larecea™ extract for regeneration. An additional ingredient is niacinamide, used for brightening. While the Elixir-V serum is meant for the skin, the Elixir-V Eyes is focused on protecting the beauty of your eyes. We believe that your eyes are the most noticeable and beautiful parts of your face. Hence, it is meant to anti-age the sensitive skin around your eyes.

 

References:

https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/skin-care-products

https: //www.futurederm.com/using-the-ring-finger-to-apply-eye-cream-is-it-really-the-weakest-finger

https://drtwlderma.com/dermatologist-designed-anti-aging-solution-elixir-v/